FREE SHIPPING Today! Coupon Code "DTOM25"for Orders over $25 Use Code DTOM25

3x5 Premium Nylon Bunker Hill Flag

3x5 Premium Nylon Bunker Hill Flag
3x5 Premium Nylon Bunker Hill Flag
Item #: NylBunkerHill
PRICE: $39.90
SALE: $27.93
YOU SAVE: 30%
Availability: Usually ships the next business day.
Quantity:
Shipping Information

Annin Made: USA Manufacturer

The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775, mostly on and around Breed's Hill, during the Siege of Boston early in the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after the adjacent Bunker Hill, which was peripherally involved in the battle and was the original objective of both colonial and British troops, but is occasionally referred to as the "Battle of Breed's Hill."
This beautiful flag is made in the USA by Annin & Co., which has been in business since 1847. All fabrics used in Annin flags are made to strict specifications developed from extensive research, testing and long experience. Annin's quality control insures that we can offer you, our customers, the best quality flags and banners. You can find cheaper flags, but not flags of higher quality. Nyl-Glo--Describes flags made of 100% SolarMax nylon for outdoor use. Featuring white Polyester Duck heading and brass grommets, or a quadruple stitched mounting pole sleeve. Strong and durable, special parachute cloth treatment reduces sun and chemical deterioration. NYL-GLO ColorFast® U.S. Historical Flags MADE WITH SOLARMAX® NYLON FLAG MATERIAL. THE COLORS OF EVERY FLAG ARE GUARANTEED SOLARMAX THIS NYLON FLAG MATERIAL OUT PERFORMS OTHER NYLONS: • Best Resistance to Damaging Ultraviolet Radiation • Dense 200 Denier Nylon Weave • Longest Lasting Nylon Flag Material Available • Flies In The Lightest Breeze • Provides The Brightest Colors For A Great Appearance Hand fitted, double needle seam with back-stitch reinforcement. Two rows of stitching on top and bottom hems. Premium quality extra-strength polyester thread, color matched. Four rows of lock stitching with back-stitch reinforcements.
The Battle of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775, mostly on and around Breed's Hill, during the Siege of Boston early in the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after the adjacent Bunker Hill, which was peripherally involved in the battle and was the original objective of both colonial and British troops, but is occasionally referred to as the "Battle of Breed's Hill." On June 13, the leaders of the colonial forces besieging Boston learned that the British generals were planning to send troops out from the city to occupy the unoccupied hills surrounding the city. In response to this intelligence, 1,200 colonial troops under the command of William Prescott stealthily occupied Bunker Hill and Breed's Hill, constructed an earthen redoubt on Breed's Hill, and built lightly fortified lines across most of the Charlestown Peninsula. When the British were alerted to the presence of the new position the next day, they mounted an attack against them. After two assaults on the Colonial lines were repulsed with significant British casualties, the British finally captured the positions on the third assault, after the defenders in the redoubt ran out of ammunition. The Colonial forces retreated to Cambridge over Bunker Hill, suffering their most significant losses on Bunker Hill. While the result was a victory for the British, they suffered their greatest losses of the entire war: over 800 wounded and 226 killed, including a notably large number of officers. Their immediate objective (the capture of Bunker Hill) was achieved, but did not significantly alter the state of siege. It did, however, demonstrate that relatively inexperienced Colonial forces were willing and able to stand up to well-trained troops in a pitched battle.
When news of the battle spread through the colonies, it was reported as a colonial loss, as the ground had been taken by the enemy, and significant casualties were incurred. George Washington, who was on his way to Boston as the new commander of the Continental Army, received news of the battle while in New York City. The report, which included casualty figures that were somewhat inaccurate, gave Washington hope that his army might prevail in the conflict.
Join our mailing list to receive special offers and exclusive promotions!
E-commerce by Yahoo!