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Gonzales Banner of 1835 (3x5 ft)

Gonzales Flag 3'x5'
Gonzales Flag 3'x5'Gonzales Flag 3'x5'Gonzales Flag 3'x5'Gonzales Flag 3'x5'Gonzales Flag 3'x5'
Item #: TAKEIT
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During the Texas war for Independence from Mexico, the Mexican government requested the return of a seized cannon. The Texans responded by raising the banner! "COME AND TAKE IT"

The original Gonzales "come and take it" cannon was a Spanish-made, bronze artillery piece of six-pound caliber. The gun was cause of fighting in late September and early October 1835 between a Mexican military detachment and Anglo colonists. The disagreement produced the battle of Gonzales, considered to be the first battle of the Texas Revolution. On January 1, 1831, the history of the cannon began when the colonists asked the political chief of Bexar, Mexico to make arrangements for a cannon to be furnished to the Gonzales colonists for protection against hostile Indians. The fact that the gun was not carriage mounted until about September 28, 1835, suggests that in 1831 it was probably swivel mounted in one of the two blockhouses that had been constructed at Gonzales in 1827. Thus mounted it would have served as a visual deterrent to hostile Indians.

During September 1835, wCol. Domingo de Ugartechea, the military commander at Bexar, sent Corporal Casimiro De León and five soldiers of the Second Flying Company of San Carlos de Parras to retrieve the cannon. The Gonzales colonists notified Ugartechea they were keeping the gun and took the soldiers prisoner. The cannon was then buried in George W. Davis's peach orchard and couriers were sent out to obtain assistance. Ugartechea responded by sending 100 troops under Lt. Francisco de Castañeda to make a more serious request for the return of the gun. On September 29, Capt. Robert M. Coleman arrived at Gonzales with a militia company of thirty mounted Indian fighters. The gun was retrieved from its shallow grave and mounted on a pair of cart wheels. After organization of the Texian "Army of the People" under Gen. Stephen F. Austin, the cannon was assigned to Capt. James C. Neill's artillery company and hauled to San Antonio. After the capture of Bexar in December 1835, the cannon remained at the Alamo, where it was one of twenty-one artillery pieces commandeered by the Mexican army upon the recapture of Bexar on March 6, 1836.

The name "Come and Take It" refers to the motto adopted by the Texian rebels. On the morning of October 2, 1835, Lieutenant Castañeda requested the cannon be returned to the Mexican military-a condition on which it had been loaned to DeWitt's Colony-but the Texians pointed to the gun which stood about 200 yards to their rear, and said, "there it is-come and take it." Soon after the conflict began, at the request of the Anglo-Celtic leaders, the ladies of the settlement hastily made a flag to fly over the cannon. The flag featured a white ground with a black cannon in the center, and the motto "Come and take it!" above and below.
3ft x 5 ft This flag’s material is a filament, warp knit polyester, producing a flag of good durability and color retention. This polyester material has an open weave that allows the flag to fly in very light breezes. Featuring white Polyester Duck heading and brass grommets.
"Come and take it" was a slogan used in the Texas Revolution in 1835. In March 1831, Juan Gomez, a Lieutenant in the Mexican Army, worked alongside Tadeo Ortiz, a consul at Bordeaux, France, and granted a small cannon to the colony of San Antonio. The small bronze cannon was received by the colony and signed for by Randy Tumlinson. It was then transported to Gonzales, Texas and later was the object of Texas pride. At the minor skirmish known as the Battle of Gonzales, a small group of Texans successfully resisted the Mexican forces who had orders to seize their cannon. As a symbol of defiance, the Texans had fashioned a flag containing the phrase along with a black star and an image of the cannon which they had received six years earlier from mexican officials. In modern times, the "come and take it" flag has been modified and used as a symbol of gun-rights advocates. The first-known modified version, from the 1980s, replaces the cannon with an M16A2 assault rifle and was displayed at a Bill of Rights rally in Arizona. In 2002, the flag was further modified to depict a Barret .50 BMG Rifle.
The Battle at Gonzalas had minimal military impact, but its "political significance was immeasurable". A large number of Texians had taken an armed stand against the Mexican army, and they had no intention of returning to their neutral stance towards Santa Anna's government. Two days after the battle, respected Texian leader Stephen F. Austin wrote to the San Felipe Committee of Public Safety, "War is declared – public opinion has proclaimed it against a Military despotism—The campaign has commenced". News of the skirmish, originally called "the fight at Williams' place", spread throughout the United States, encouraging many adventurers to come to Texas and assist in the fight against Mexico. Newspapers referred to the conflict as the "Lexington of Texas"; as the Battles of Lexington and Concord began the American Revolution, the Gonzales skirmish launched the Texas Revolution.
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