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2x3 Ft Premium Nylon Join Or Die Flag

2x3 Ft Premium Nylon Join Or Die Flag
2x3 Ft Premium Nylon Join Or Die Flag2x3 Ft Premium Nylon Join Or Die Flag2x3 Ft Premium Nylon Join Or Die Flag
Item #: joindieflag
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The popularity of this Join or Die flag has increased due to award winning HBO's series John Adams. The image is of a curving snake cut into pieces, each of which bears the abbreviated name of one of the 13 original colonies. The title, Join, or Die, and its alternate caption, Unite or Die,is an admonition to join together in order to survive, first, a foreign power on the frontier, but, later, Britain's tyrannical behavior toward her colonies. This image was published in the May 9, 1754 issue of Franklin's paper, The Pennsylvania Gazette.
This beautiful flag is made in the USA by Annin & Co., which has been in business since 1847. All fabrics used in Annin flags are made to strict specifications developed from extensive research, testing and long experience. Annin's quality control insures that we can offer you, our customers, the best quality flags and banners. You can find cheaper flags, but not flags of higher quality. Nyl-Glo--Describes flags made of 100% SolarMax nylon for outdoor use. Featuring white Polyester Duck heading and brass grommets. Strong and durable, special parachute cloth treatment reduces sun and chemical deterioration. NYL-GLO ColorFast® U.S. Historical Flags MADE WITH SOLARMAX® NYLON FLAG MATERIAL. THE COLORS OF EVERY FLAG ARE GUARANTEED SOLARMAX THIS NYLON FLAG MATERIAL OUT PERFORMS OTHER NYLONS: • Best Resistance to Damaging Ultraviolet Radiation • Dense 200 Denier Nylon Weave • Longest Lasting Nylon Flag Material Available • Flies In The Lightest Breeze • Provides The Brightest Colors For A Great Appearance Hand fitted, double needle seam with back-stitch reinforcement. Two rows of stitching on top and bottom hems. Premium quality extra-strength polyester thread, color matched. Four rows of lock stitching with back-stitch reinforcements.
Join, or Die is a famous political cartoon created by Benjamin Franklin and first published in his Pennsylvania Gazette on May 9, 1754. The original publication by the Gazette is the earliest known pictorial representation of colonial union produced by a British colonist in America. It is a woodcut showing a snake severed into eighths, with each segment labeled with the initial of a British American colony or region. However, New England was represented as one colony, rather than the four colonies it was at that time. In addition, Delaware and Georgia were omitted completely. Thus, it has 8 segments of snake rather than the traditional 13. The cartoon appeared along with Franklin's editorial about the "disunited state" of the colonies, and helped make his point about the importance of colonial unity. During that era, there was a superstition that a snake which had been cut into pieces would come back to life if the pieces were put together before sunset. At that time, the colonists were divided on whether to fight the French and their Indian allies for control of the land west of the Appalachian Mountains, in what came to be known as the French and Indian War. It became a symbol for the need of organized action against an outside threat posed by the French and Indians in the mid 18th century. Writer Philip Davidson states that Franklin was a propagandist influential in seeing the potential in political cartoons. Franklin had proposed the Albany Plan and his cartoon suggested that such a union was necessary to avoid destruction. As Franklin wrote, "The Confidence of the French in this Undertaking seems well-grounded on the present disunited State of the British Colonies, and the extreme Difficulty of bringing so many different Governments and Assemblies to agree in any speedy and effectual Measures for our common defense and Security; while our Enemies have the very great Advantage of being under one Direction, with one Council, and one Purse...." Franklin's political cartoon took on a different meaning during the lead up to the American Revolution, especially around 1765-1766, during the Stamp Act Congress. British colonists in America protesting British rule used the cartoon in the Constitutional Courant to help persuade the colonists. However, the Patriots, who associated the image with eternity, vigilance, and prudence, were not the only ones who saw a new interpretation of the cartoon. The Loyalists saw the cartoon with more biblical traditions, such as those of guile, deceit, and treachery. Franklin himself opposed the use of his cartoon at this time, but instead advocated a moderate political policy; in 1766, he published a new cartoon "MAGNA Britannia: her Colonies REDUC'D" Because of Franklin's initial cartoon, however, the "Courant" was thought of in England as one of the most radical publications. The difference between the use of "Join or Die" in 1754 and 1765 is that Franklin had designed it to unite the colonies for defense against France, but in 1765 American colonists used it to urge colonial unity against the British. Also during this time the phrase "join, or die" changed to "unite, or die," in some states such as New York and Pennsylvania. Soon after the publication of the cartoon during the Stamp Act Congress, variations were printed in New York, Massachusetts, and a couple months later it had spread to Virginia and South Carolina. In some states, such as New York and Pennsylvania, the cartoon continued to be published week after week for over a year. The cartoon has been reprinted and redrawn widely throughout American history. Variants of the cartoon have different texts, e.g. "Unite or Dead", and differently labeled segments, depending on the political bodies being appealed to. During the American Revolutionary War, the image became a potent symbol of Colonial unity and resistance to what was seen as British oppression. It returned to service, suitably redrawn, for both sides of the American Civil War.
The Major League Soccer expansion team, the Philadelphia Union (set to play in 2010), paid homage to the cartoon by incoporating it (but written as "Jungite aut Perite," the Latin translation), along with the coiled rattlesnake from the Gadsden flag, into their new logo that was unveiled in May, 2009 at a rally at Philadelphia's City Hall.
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