FREE SHIPPING. Orders over $100 - We Ship Everywhere APOs/FPOs/POBs-

Lorenzo de Zavala TEXAS Flag of 1836

Lorenzo de Zavala TEXAS Flag of 1836
Item #: zavala-texas-flag
PRICE: $11.25
SALE: $7.87
YOU SAVE: 30%
Availability: Usually ships the next business day
Quantity:
Shipping Information
Share |

3ft x 5 ft Super Poly Flag

Texas has had many flags that have represented the Great State of Texas (and even before it was recognized as a state).

Texans aren't known for being very subtle, and they like to put the Texas Lone Star Flag on just about everything...which to our way of thinking, is the perfect Texas home decor or makes the perfect Texas gift! There is no such thing as too much Texas!
3ft x 5 ft This flag’s material is a filament, warp knit polyester, producing a flag of good durability and color retention. This polyester material has an open weave that allows the flag to fly in very light breezes. Featuring white Polyester Duck heading and brass grommets.
Through the times, there have been several flags used in support of the independence of Texas, both originally in the fight against Mexico, again during the Civil War, and now today. Most are based around the Bonnie Blue and Lone Star designs. The Republic of Texas was an independent nation in North America, bordering the United States and Mexico, that existed from 1836 to 1846. Formed as a break-away republic from Mexico by the Texas Revolution, the state claimed borders that encompassed an area that included all of the present U.S. state of Texas, as well as parts of present-day New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming based upon the Treaties of Velasco between the newly created Texas Republic and Mexico. The eastern boundary with the United States was defined by the Adams-Onís Treaty between the United States and Spain, in 1819. Its southern and western-most boundary with Mexico was under dispute throughout the existence of the Republic, with Texas claiming that the boundary was the Rio Grande, and Mexico claiming the Nueces River as the boundary. This dispute would later become a trigger for the Mexican–American War, after the annexation of Texas by the United States.
Join our mailing list to receive special offers and exclusive promotions!
E-commerce by Yahoo!